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of the members here. >> alec's domination of arizona proved too much for state representative steve farley. >> i just want to emphasize it's fine for corporations to be involved in the process. corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly. they don't have the right to lobby people and not register as lobbyists. they don't have the right to take people away on trips, convince them of it, send them back here, and then nobody has seen what's gone on and how that legislator had gotten that idea and where is it coming from. >> farley has introduced a bill to force legislators to disclose their alec ties, just as the law already requires them to do with any lobbyist. >> all i'm asking in the alec accountability act is to make sure that all of those expenses are reported as if they are lobbying expenses and all those gifts that legislators received are reported as if they're receiving the gifts from lobbyists so the public can find out and make up their own minds about who is influencing what. >> steve farley's bill has gone nowhere. alec, on t
williams, remember, and pointed this out yesterday steve jobs told president obama, those manufacturing jobs are never going to be here in the united states. tim cook says, well, guess what? i am taking al company in a different direction. >> in many ways one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden is that he told me on a couple of pages before he passed away to never question what he would have done. never asked a question what steve do, to just do what's right. >> so there was no wwsd. just do the right thing. now, here is where i disagree with tim cook a little bit. he said, here's why we haven't done this earlier. >> honestly, it's not too much about price. it's about the skills, et cetera. over time, there are skills that are associated with manufacturing that have left the u.s. not necessarily people but the education for producing. >> now, you see, i disagree with that. the skills are here americans can make these products. they can make them as good and better earn anybody in the entire world. we have a great skilled workforce
. feels like membership. >>> good morning from new york. i'm steve in for chris hayes who will appear later in the program interviewing dan savage. it's about dan's marriage in washington state. they are one of the couples getting married there. after voters extended marriage rights to same-sex couples by popular vote last month. we have david johnston, the author of "fine print." he's a pulitzer prize winning tax writer at new york times and now at the college of law. we have the president and ceo of the center of american progress who served in the obama and clinton administrations, policy director of hillary clinton's campaign. laura flanders, founder of the editor of and the woman who hired me two years ago. thanks, as always for that. >> of course. >> anyway, on friday afternoon, house speaker john boehner attempted to paint a picture of white house negotiations and how to avoid going over the fiscal curve. i have been saying fiscal slope. now on the show, i'll go with curve. >> this isn't a progress report because there's no progress to report. four days ag
: many of mf global's customers were from main street. >> how are you doing? >> narrator: steve meyers used mf global to trade futures on behalf of scores of farmers and ranchers in the midwest. >> adm does most things... >> many people cleared through mf global because they were the world's largest. so it gives you some comfort in the fact that you're always going to have that liquidity, you're dealing with somebody that's everywhere in the world. >> narrator: but when corzine took over mf global, the firm was in deep trouble. revenue from commissions wasn't covering expenses. the firm was losing money. >> when corzine first came in, the ratings agencies told him, "look, you stepped into a firm that has a lot of problems. so you don't have unlimited time. the ratings on this firm are fairly low for a firm in its business and the bias is to move them lower." and so that put more pressure on corzine than he would have otherwise faced. >> we're transforming from sort of an old-line brokerage firm into an investment bank. >> narrator: corzine set about cutting costs and replacing old-line
,000 followers. now she's up to 200,000 followers. so sign on. >> steve: very simple to do. thank you very much for filling in. brian will be back here tomorrow. >> gretchen: see you then. >> steve: have a great day, everybody. martha: thanks, you guys. we start with this fox news alert. there is live look, lansing, michigan. massive crowds gathering at the state capitol. they're protesting the state's right to work law. the lawmakers set to cast the final votes inside that building this morning. we understand the governor is very ready to sign that into law. very controversial situation going on live in lansing. good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum. you are here in america's nice room. >> i'm gregg jarrett in for bill gregg: the right to work vote will mean unions will no longer force workers to pay dues. that the birthplace of the powerful united auto workers union. martha: this has huge national implications over the power of organized labor. governor rick snyder believes there will be more job. he believes the protests hurt more than they help. here he is. >> if you go forward you
our troops in iraq and afghanistan indefinitely but making stuff up to prove his point, as steve bennett points out. obama never said the united states overreacted to 9/11 or did he apologize for our actions. >> 9/11 was an enormous trauma to our country. the fear and anger it provoked was understandable. but in some cases it led us to act contrary to our traditions and our ideas. >> dick cheney is up to his old tricks, still lobbying for endless war and lying to make his case. i'm joined by colonel lawrence wilkerson, former chief of staff at the state department and a visiting professor of government and public policy at the college of william and mary. it is amazing that dick cheney's view of the middle east hasn't changed a bit. does that surprise you? >> it doesn't surprise me. i would have thought he would have grown a little in wisdom since that time. one of the reasons the middle east is hostile to u.s. interests today is because we invaded iraq. >> he thinks we should still be there. what is your response? >> he thinks we should be there because he believes we should be
the house after the adjournment of this congress. ohioans benefited from the service of steve latourette, who occupies the speaker's chair today, representatives dennis kucinich, betty sutton and steve augsrya. i want to thank steve latourette for his leadership and guidance in congress. i have had a privilege to working with my colleagues in support of our fellow buckeyes and americans. their service will not end with this congress. their innovative ideas and selfless service will be felt long after they leave the people's house. i look forward to their future roles as ohioans committed to advancing the interests of our communities, our state and our great country. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from california, the minority leader, ms. pelosi, for five minutes. ms. pells: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i -- ms. pelosi: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i'm glad that our speaker has brought the fiscal challenges to this floor. it's been long overdue. we have been calling on the
way to the witness panel beginning with steve haydee who was hurt and served for three consecutive mandates as the armed groups experts on the drc. investigate and co-authored reports submitted and presented to the u.n. security council sanctions committee during the groups expire 2012 mandate he was also coordinator of the six member team working under security council resolution 2021. prior to joining the group of experts, mr. hege worked with organizations. really here with john prendergast, cofounder of the enough project, initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. these are the quick administration and the state department congress. he's worked with unicef, human rights, international crisis group and episode five and help launch the sentinel project pictures clingy. mr. prendergast to search for peace in africa for well over a quarter century. then we would hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at hanford university server is petitioned the professor, lecturing africans to visit john's heart and university school of events international studies. mr.
at >>> over his five decade career, photographer steve shapiro has photographed everything from presidents to poodles and he's hinds classic photos of rock stars, film stars, and migrant workers and the selma march. we have some never before published photos. >> thank you. >> it's called "then and now." a real theme of juxtaposition. not only timewise, but the images you take. i want to start with the first one. kind of jarring. two little girls, which i think is in the selma march in alabama, 1965, juxtaposed with two little girls in chicago at american girl place. why is this so interesting to you? you set them up on the page that way. >> because it's two different styles in america. two different areas of america, and always interested me to capture all of the different elements that make up our country. the two girls are watching the selma march, come into montgomery, alabama, and the little girls just bought these dolls at an expensive store in chicago. it's just -- it's a different look at things. >> you like to do class structure, and i think especially in
by american banker and called the next steve jobs. we'll get to the bottom of that. the ceo joins us now. >> thanks for having me. >> since the last time i've seen you you've been on the cover of forbes as innovator of the year. >> i walked by the news stand and you were just getting square underway the last, right before we saw you last time on the show. and the things have changed dramatically. air now being called the innovator of the year and compared to steve jobs for your innovation. tell me how square is changing the face of american business? >> we start with a simple idea which was, you know, my parents were entrepreneurs. they started up local businesses and my father started a pizza restaurants when he was a kid and my mother the coffee store and they face the challenges just starting up. and also accepting patients extremely challenges, so we made it easy for any small business or neighborhood place it instantly accept credit cards by giving them a free credit card reader and accept credit cards for 2.75% and we signed up over 3 million merchants. >> i have to say when i went
create strong, vibrant middle class. >> yeah. >> we talked to steve rattner about jobs coming back to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that i
a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just passed tax cuts for the middle class americans and then fight later on for spending cuts and increasing taxes for the wealthy? caller: the tax cut for the general population is great. that would be good for stimulating the economy. but the big thing is hit there needs to be a balanced plan. we need more revenue and we need less spending at the federal level. what is good for california is not good for virginia and what's good for virginia is not good for maryland. maybe we need to focus on reducing the federal government overview. been there w
that clear. right. steve ducey fox and friends. >> every day the nation gets one step closer to the so-called fiscal cliff. right now, there are only 25 shopping days left for congress and the president to negotiate a deal. he doesn't want to make a deal. less less monday at the hall, more -- he's less monty hall, more monti burns to extract pain on the republicans. >> stephanie: so the issue that he ran and won on -- >> well, i think what's so frustrating for republicans is the last time we had some of these dopey countdown to the clock of armageddon was with the debt deal. and republicans were in a much stronger position for better or for worse just because they were willing to you know, blow up the whole debt deal, et cetera. so i think you know, they wish it was like that. they wished -- when that unfolded, obama was taking hit after hit. he did not have the leverage. he obviously hadn't just won an election. his approval ratings were going in the tank. so they're upset that this isn't a rerun. they're upset
a drop in the ocean. host: steve in massachusetts, democratic caller. caller: the home and that was just talking, i disagree with her as far as a drop in the bucket, when you look at curbing government pay. when you guys talk about the areas that get cut, the military spending, discretionary spending, and entitlements, what i want to hear in addition to that is government waste and fraud. when you talk about entitlements, you hear a lot of people argue about public waste and fraud. government waste and fraud, i think the later referred to it as instances. the gsa had a great deal of money being improperly spent. senator tom coburn has talked about redundancy in programs, senators and congressmen not looking back to see if there is a matrix in place and to see if they're actually working so that nonperforming programs -- host: let's get a response, because we're running out of time. guest: once again, i cannot emphasize enough that i am very much in favor of eliminating fraud and waste and inefficiency. it is hard to do. i don't agree with you that we are not doing it already. and i don't
this law. if you look at those on the other side though, and i'm looking at a quote from steve cook, president of the michigan education association. he says this. whether the proponents call this rite to work or freedom to work, it is freedom to freeload. many unions say if they don't have people come in to join the unions, pay dues, necessary, unions lose power. unions in their argument protected working conditions and wages for years in this country. this is the big transition. not only state to go through it. we do expect rick snyder at any moment today to sign this legislation into law. we'll take you back to michigan as we hear more. obviously a lot of people on both sides debating this today. rick: we're all over that important story. we're also following new developments out of north korea and that country's plan to test a long range rocket. the launch was scheduled to happen any day now. north korea dismantling the rocket to take it off the lawn of pad. is the north caving in to international pressure or could this mean something else entirely. >>> also a kansas family murd
and live in an america where they can come true. some of you share passion on this issue. steve scalise, a congressman from louisiana, recently elected as the leader of the republican study committee for the next congress. i yield to the gentleman from louisiana. mr. scalise: i thank the gentlelady for her leadership, not only for hosting this hour but for being so passionate about the need to control spending, and the need to get the economy back on track. she was talking about about solutions to avert the fiscal cliff. if if you look at how we got here, nothing gets resolved out of washington, it's an abyss that doesn't need to happen. if you just go back and look at the promises made by poth because massachusetts when he was running for office, when he was running for re-election, he talked about working across the aisle he talked about bipartisan solutions he talked about it a lot and the american people expected that the president would keep that promise. but before the ink was even dry, before some of the states had confirmed and finalized their vote totals for this last election,
because the end will be -- steve spurrier still hasn't recovered from his stint in washington. the guy was a football god. he went to washington and immediately the stories started, you know, that this guy was bush league. he was a college coach. if saban goes up and fails a second time -- and god bless him, he's done enough for alabama, he deserves that right, or do you want to be remembered the greatest college football coach of all time? he sticks around another ten years, wins more champion sshi people consider this guy the john wooden of college football. >> when you look at what they've done p college coaches, that could be the lure, but he was miserable when he was at miami. in his second year with the dolphins, he was looking for opportunities back at the college game. i think it would take a lot to get him back to the nfl. when you look at all the teams that will need coaches -- >> but why go? >> well, money. a lot of money. a whole lot of money. >> in the words of dire straits, he's got a daytime job. he's doing all right. but again, seriously. you've got the chance to be the
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)